About-Laura

Born in Northwest Indiana, Laura's a graduate of River Forest High School (home of the Ingots) and got her bachelor's degree from Purdue and a master's from Indiana University [we think she roots for both even when they play each other].

Her work has won several awards from the Indiana Broadcasters Association, Society of Professional Journalists/Indiana Chapter, and Network Indiana. She has also had academic papers selected for presentation at national conferences like the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and Broadcast Education Association.

Laura watched her share of game shows growing up and one summer while in California, she's chosen to be a contestant on "Sale of the Century". Her TV favorites include The Honeymooners, Project Runway, Seinfeld, The Big Bang Theory, Doctor Who and Star Trek (TNG and the original). She also enjoys crossword puzzles and when asked what some of her favorite places to visit are she says -- office supply stores.



Lauras-Blog

Last Chance Rescue: Charlie

Animal Corner

Charlie is a 3 year old Great Dane mix who great with children and people. He is neutered, current on vaccines, potty trained, and weighs 75 pounds. If you're interested in Charlie, please call Last Chance Rescue at 219-677-2961.

Charlie

 

Humane Soc Calumet Area to Compete in $100K Challenge

Animal Corner

Highland, Ind. (March 26, 2014) — Beginning June 1, Humane Society Calumet Area (HSCA) will be a contestant in the 2014 ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge. HSCA is competing for a chance at more than $600,000 in grant funding, including a grand prize of $100,000.

The 2014 ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge is a nationwide competition for animal shelters (and their communities) aimed at getting more animals adopted or returned to their owners than ever before. The challenge takes place throughout the months of June through August and the HSCA has set a goal of placing 675 animals in forever homes during that time.

“We are very excited to participate in the ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge. It is a great way to bring the communities of Northwest Indiana together as a team of lifesavers to help connect hundreds of shelter animals with the right families,” said Rachel Delaney, Executive Director of HSCA. “Working together, we will save hundreds of animals and enrich the lives of new adopting families and we’ll have a shot at the $100,000 grant, which would fund spay and neuter efforts in our area.”

For the challenge, HSCA chose the theme of “Rescue Me.” Throughout the summer at the shelter, HSCA will offer Save Me Saturdays with reduced adoption fees for a special group—including police officers, firefighters, EMTS, doctors, nurses and more—during each event.

Five times during the summer, the shelter will host Empty the Shelter weekends on a Saturday and Sunday with no-cost adoption fees for qualifying applicants. A tentative list of adoption events and specials can be found on www.hscalumet.org/aspca.asp.

This challenge offers the HSCA a shot at the $100,000 grant, which would help HSCA continue to fulfill its mission to lead the community in the humane treatment of animals. In addition to placing nearly 1,500 abandoned animals in forever homes last year, HSCA is very active within the community by providing the following services:

·         Estelle Marcus Clinic: Since opening its doors to low-income members of the public in July 2012, the clinic has provided more than 3,100 spay and neuter surgeries to those with financial hardship.

·         Pet Therapy Teams: HSCA pet therapy teams visit nursing homes and assisted living facilities four times a week.

·         Humane Education: HSCA's humane education team helps teach local children about pet safety and compassion.

For more information about HSCA's participation in the 2014 ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge and how you can volunteer, sponsor, or adopt, please visit www.hscalumet.org/aspca.asp.

 

Dunes Dog Training Club May Classes

Animal Corner

The Dunes Dog Training Club's next Beginner Obedience class will start on May 7th. Classes are held at the club building, located at 110 N. Main St. in Hebron, IN. This class is for dogs 6 months of age & older; cost for the class is $90.00 for the 8 week session. Owners must bring proof of their dog's current vaccinations on the first night; dogs should be wearing a metal training collar attached to a 6ft leather leash. Experienced instructors will teach owners how to train their dogs in basic obedience, using positive reinforcement only, in the form of treats & praise. For further information please call 219-996-4770, 219-916-1594, 219-756-7035.

The Dunes Dog Training Club's next Puppy Obedience Class will begin on May 14th. This class is for puppies 2-6 months of age; cost for the class is $80.00 for the 7 week session. Classes are held at the club building, located at 110 N. Main St. in Hebron, IN. Puppies should be wearing a flat, buckle-type collar attached to a 6ft leather leash. Experienced instructors teach owners how to train their puppies in very basic obedience, using positive reinforcement only, in the form of treats. For further information please call 219-996-4770, 219-916-1594, 219-756-7035.

 

Severe Weather Planning for Pets: Easy as 1-2-3

Animal Corner

INDIANAPOLIS (17 March 2014)—As cold winter weather yields to sunny days, Hoosier pet owners should plan now for the inevitable stormy weather that arrives with spring. Preparing now can keep every member of the family (including those with fur or feathers) safe in the face of tornadoes, flooding or power outages.

According to Sandra Norman, DVM, Companion Animal Director for the Indiana State Board of Animal Health (BOAH), planning is as easy as 1, 2, 3.

“Preparedness planning for pets is not hard to do,” explains Dr. Norman. “Just think ahead to what your pet would need for three to five days if life is disrupted by a disaster. There are really just three components to have in a disaster plan.”
• A “Go Kit”:  Have assembled, in one place and ready to grab in an instant, everything a pet would need for a three- to five-day trip away from home. This includes a crate/carrier, water and food bowls, bottled water and food, leash, treats, toys, medications, copies of vaccination records and (for cats) litter and a disposable litter pan.

“A Go Kit should be customized to the individual needs of each animal, whether it’s a cat or bird or large dog. Everything should be in one place, ready to go to keep your pet comfortable,” she said.
•An evacuation plan:  Pre-determine three to five places where your pet can stay if you must leave your home quickly. This could be a kennel, veterinary clinic with boarding services, the home of a friend or family member, or (for those who prefer to stay with their pets) pet-friendly hotels. Have all the contact information, including addresses and phone numbers stored in Go Kit or on a smart phone. Identify places 5 miles to 20 miles away from home, in case the disaster area is widespread.

“Confirming policies and selecting sites ahead of time can ease much stress in an emergency,” said Dr. Norman.
•A shelter-in-place plan:  In some situations, staying at home (or “sheltering in place”) may be the best option for your pet. When you need to stay put with your animals, secure them indoors, like in a bathroom, barn or garage, preferably without windows. The smaller space will protect the pet from injury from debris or weather conditions. If possible, provide the added security of a crate or cage, to provide a calm environment when pets are more likely to act out under stress.

“Bathrooms are ideal, because they are small, have running water, and often pet-friendly flooring,” she explained.

A disaster plan for animals does not have to be complicated or difficult to prepare.

“The important thing is to have everything in one place and, in the case of evacuation plans, written down,” Dr. Norman notes. “The extra 10 or 15 minutes you will save by not having to gather everything on your way out the door, can mean the difference between life or death to you and your pet.”

For more information on disaster planning for animals, visit the BOAH website at www.boah.in.gov or Facebook at www.facebook.com/inboah . [Indiana State Board of Animal Health news release]

 

Photos:Coast Guard Crew Rescues Dog Stranded on Ice

Animal Corner

Michigan-based Coast Guard cutter crew rescues dog stranded on ice on Lake St. Clair.  

rescue one

Crew members assigned to Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay assist a dog they found stranded on the ice of Lake St. Clair March 4, 2014. The crew transported the dog to the ship and hoisted him aboard, where he was provided food and first aid before being transferred to an area animal shelter for further care.  //U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy Cutter Bristol Bay
 
 
rescue two

The dog was taken inside the ship, where he was provided food and first aid before being transferred to an area animal shelter for further care. //U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy Cutter Bristol Bay The Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay is a 140-foot ice-breaking tug homeported in Detroit.  The crew of the cutter rescued another dog who was stranded on the ice back in March 2011: http://greatlakes.coastguard.dodlive.mil/2011/03/big-dog-in-big-trouble-coast-guardsmen-rescue-great-dane-from-frozen-lake-huron/

 

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E-mail: news@radiooneindiana.com
Studio Phone: 1-219-980-2577

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